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Joseph J. Ferrare, PhD

Joseph J. Ferrare, PhD


Advisory Board Member

Joseph J. Ferrare is an assistant professor in the School of Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences at the University of Washington Bothell. His current research focuses on issues related to school choice and college access, social capital and postsecondary persistence, and the role of networks in shaping education policy formation. These projects make use of a variety of methodologies, from causal modeling to mixed methods designs centering on social network analysis.

Kimberly A. Griffin, PhD

Kimberly A. Griffin, PhD


Advisory Board Member

Dr. Kimberly Griffin is an Associate Professor at the University of Maryland. Her work focuses on diversity within the Black community; mentoring and professional development; and diversity in graduate and faculty communities. She worked in orientation, admissions, and graduate student diversity and outreach before becoming a faculty member. 

Joseph Rasmussen, MSW

Joseph Rasmussen, MSW


Advisory Board Member

Mr. Joe Rasmussen is Veteran Services Coordinator with University Veteran Services at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. Mr. Rasmussen, who earned his Master of Social Work from the UW–Madison, focuses on supporting military-connected students as they transition into higher education. Prior to his current position, Mr. Rasmussen was an intern with the Acute Care Social Work and Transition and Care Management Teams at the William S. Middleton Memorial Veterans Hospital in Madison. His recent work has been centered on improving veteran outcome reporting in higher education, leading state and national policy advocacy efforts, and growing support networks for military-connected students. Mr. Rasmussen served on active duty in the United States Marine Corps from 2002 to 2006.

Mario L. Small, PhD

Mario L. Small, PhD


Advisory Board Member

Dr. Mario L. Small, Grafstein Family Professor at Harvard University, is the author of award-winning books and articles on networks, poverty, organizations, culture, methods, neighborhoods, institutions, and other topics. He is currently using large-scale administrative data to understand isolation in cities, studying how people use their networks to meet their needs, and exploring the epistemological foundations of qualitative research. His latest book is Someone to Talk To (Oxford). A study of how people decide whom to approach when seeking support, the book is an inquiry into human nature, a critique of network analysis, and a discourse on the role of qualitative research in the big-data era.

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